Print Bibliography

Portraits

  • Allard, Joseph. “The painted sermon: the self portrait of Thomas Smith.” Journal of American Studies. 10:3 (1976): 341-348.
  • Baumgarten, Linda. What Clothes Reveal: The Language of Clothing in Colonial and Federal America. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 2002.
  • Barratt, Carrie Rebora and Ellen G. Miles. Gilbert Stuart. (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2004) pp. 128-36.
  • Brookhiser, Richard. George Washington: A National Treasure. Washington DC: Smithsonian Institution, 2002.
  • Craven, Wayne. Colonial American Portraiture: The Economic, Religious, Social, Cultural, Philosophical, Scientific, and Aesthetic Foundations. Cambridge University Press, 1986.
  • Dabakis, Melissa. “’Ain’t I a Woman?” Anne Whitney, Edmonia Lewis, and the Iconography of Emancipation” in Patricia Johnston, ed., Seeing High & Low: Representing Social Conflict in American Visual Culture (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006), pp. 84-102.
  • Frank, Robin Jaffee. Love and Loss: American Portrai and Mourning Miniatures. New Haven: Yae University Press; Yale University Art Gallery, 2000.
  • Katz, Wendy, “Portraits and the Production of the Civil Self in Seventeenth-Century Boston.” Winterthur Portfolio 39 (Summer/Autumn 2004): 102-128.
  • Lacey, Barbara E. “Visual Images of Blacks in Early American Imprints.” William and Mary Quarterly 53 (January 1996): 137-180.
  • Miles, Ellen G. Saint-Mémin and the Neoclassical Profilt Portrait in the America. Washington: National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian Institue Press, 1994. pp. 47-59, 142-158.
  • Rather, Susan, "Carpenter, Tailor, Shoemaker, Artist: Copley and Portrait Painting around 1770." The Art Bulletin, Vol. 79, No. 2 (Jun., 1997), pp. 269-290.
  • Sadik, Marvin. "Heroes for a New Nation, 1776-1812," in American Portraiture in the Grand Manner, 1720-1920 (Los Angeles, CA: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1981), 21-26.
  • Sloat, Caroline F, ed. Meet Your Neighbors: New England Portraits, Painters and Society, 1790-1850 (University of Massachusetts Press, 1992) pp. 1-21, 23-46.

Representing History

  • Aikin, Roger Cushing. “Paintings of Manifest Destiny: Mapping the Nation.” American Art 14, (Autumn, 2000): 78-89.
  • Boime, Al. The Art of Exclusion: Representing Blacks in the Nineteenth Century. (Washington, D. C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1990): pp. 199-219.
  • Giese, Lucretia H. “Prisoners from the Front: An American History Painting?” in Marc Simpson, Nicolai Cikovsky, and Lucretia Giese, Winslow Homer: Paintings of the Civil War (San Francisco: Fine Arts Museum, 1988) pp. 65-82.
  • Giese, Lucretia H. and Patricia M. Burnham. “Introduction: History Painting: How it Works,” Redefining History Painting. NY: Cambridge University Press, 1995. pp. 1-14.
  • Irmscher, Christoph. Chapter 5: "Audubon at Large." in The Poetics of Natural History, John Bartram to William James (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1999) pp. 188-235.
  • Jaffe, Irma B. John Trumbull: Patriot-Artist of the American Revolution. Boston: NY Graphic, 1975.
  • Pike, Martha V. and Janice Gray Armstrong. A Time to Mourn: Epressions of Grief in Nineteenth Century America. Stony Brook, NY: Museums of Stony Brook, 1980.
  • Savage, Kirk. Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves: Race, War and Monument in Nineteenth-Century America (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1997): 193-208.
  • Thistlethwaite, Mark. “The Most Important Themes: History Painting and Its Place in American Art,” in William H. Gerdts and Mark Thistlewaite, Grand Illusions: History Painting in America. Fort Worth: Amon Carter Museum, 1988. pp. 7-58.
  • Viola, Herman J. et al. Warrior Artists: Historic Cheyenne and Kiowa Indian Ledger Art. Washington, DC: National Geographic Society, 1998.
  • Wierich, Jochen. “Struggling through History: Emanuel Leutze, Hegel and Empire.” America Art 15 (Summer, 2001): 52-71.

Landscape

  • Anderson, Nancy K. and Linda S. Ferber. Albert Bierstadt: Art & Enterprise. New York: Hudson Hills Press, 1991.
  • Bartram, William. Travels of William Bartram. Reprint: Cosimo Classics, 2007.
  • Bedell, Rebecca. The Anatomy of Nature: Geology and American Landscape Painting, 1825-1875. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2000.
  • Burke, Edmund. A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful. 1757. Reprint: New York: Dover, 2008.
  • Conron, John. American Picturesque. University Park: Penn State University Press, 2000.
  • Hass, Kristin Ann. “Seashell Monuments and Cities for the Silent: American Funerary Traditions,” in Carried to the Wall: American Memory and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998): 64-87.
  • Humboldt, Alexander von. Cosmos: A Sketch of the Physical Description of the Universe, 1845-1861. Reprint: Kessinger Publishing, 2007.
  • Linden-Ward, Blanche. Silent City on a Hill: Landscapes of Memory and Boston’s Mount Auburn Cemetery Boston: University of Massachusetts Press, 2007. 175-237.
  • Miller, Angela L. The Empire of the Eye: Landscape Representation and American Cultural Politics, 1825-1875. Ithaca, NY.: Cornell University Press, 1996.
  • Nygren, Edward J. Views and Visions: American Landscape Before 1830 (Washington DC: Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1986) pp. 3-81.
  • Rhodes, Richard. John James Audubon: The Making of an American. New York: Vintage, 2006.
  • Wallach, Alan. "Accounting for the Panoramic in Hudson River School Landscape Painting," in New World: Creating an American Art, Elizabeth Mankin Kornhauser, ed., pp. 79-89.
  • Wallach, Alan. “Making a Picture of the View from Mount Holyoke,” in David Cameron Miller, ed. American Iconology: New Approaches to Nineteenth- Century Art and Literature (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1993), pp. 80-91.
  • Wallach, Alan. "Thomas Cole and the Course of American Empire," in Alan Wallach and William H. Truettner, Thomas Cole: Landscape into History (Washington, D.C.: National Museum of American Art; New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994), pp. 90-98.
  • Wilmerding, John. A History of American Marine Painting. Boston: Little, Brown, 1968.
  • Wilton, Andrew and Tim Barringer. American Sublime: Landscape Painting in the United States, 1820-1880. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002.

General Works: Visual and Material Culture

  • Barnhill, Georgia B., ed. Prints of New England. Worcester: American Antiquarian Society, 1991.
  • Berger, Martin A. Sight Unseen: Whiteness and American Visual Culture. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005.
  • Burnham, Patricia M. “Custer’s Last Stand: High-Low on Old and New Frontiers” in Patricia Johnston, ed., Seeing High & Low: Representing Social Conflict in American Visual Culture (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006), pp. 124-141.
  • Carson, Cary, Ronald Hoffman, and Peter J. Albert, eds. Of Consuming Interests: the Style of Life in the Eighteenth Century. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1994.
  • Catlin, George. “Letter 21,” Manners, Customs, and Conditions of the North American Indians, 1832-1839, Vol. I (Reprint: NY: Dover, 1973): pp. 144-154.
  • Cooper, James F. Chapter 32 in Last of the Mohicans online at: http://www.americanliterature.com/Cooper/TheLastoftheMohicans/33.html
  • Crain, Patricia. The Story of A: The Alphabetization of America from The New England Primer to The Scarlet Letter. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000.
  • Craven, Wayne. Sculpture in America: From the Colonial Period to the Present. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1968.
  • Deetz, James. In Small Things Forgotten: The Archaeology of Early American Life (rev. ed). Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1996.
  • Gardner, Albert TenEyck. Yankee Stonecutters: The First American School of Sculpture, 1800-1850 (New York: Published for the Metropolitan Museum of Art by Columbia University Press, 1945): pp. 10-17.
  • Glassie, Henry. Material Culture. Bloomington, IA: Indiana University Press, 1999.
  • Johnston, Patricia. Seeing High & Low: Representing Social Conflict in American Visual Culture. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006.
  • Masur, Louis P., “’Pictures Have Now Become a Necessity’: The Use of Images in American History Textbooks,” Journal of American History 84:4 (March 1998), pp. 1409-24.
  • Miles, Ellen G. et al. American Paintings of the Eighteenth Century. Washington: National Gallery, 1995.
  • "Ornithological Biography: American Flamingo," (Plate 53) in John James Audubon: Writings and Drawings (Library of America, 1999), pp. 515-519.
  • Pritchard, Margaret B. "'Useful & elegant furniture for screens, halls, large rooms, stair cases': Maps as Symbolic Objects." In Margaret Beck Pritchard and Henry G. Taliaferro, Degrees of Latitude: Mapping Colonial America. (Williamsburg, VA: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 2002) pp. 42-53.
  • Promey, Sally, “Seeing the Self ‘In Frame.’” Material Religion: The Journal of Objects, Art, and Belief 1:1 (March 2005): 10-47
  • Prown, Jules David. “Truth of Material Culture: History or Fiction?” in American Artifacts: Essays in Material Culture, Kenneth Haltman and Jules Prown, eds. (Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2000).
  • Rosenbach, A.S. W. Early American Children’s Books. New York: Kraus Reprint Corp., 1966.
  • Shields, David S. and Robert Blair St. George. Conversing by Signs: Poetics of Implication in Colonial New England Culture. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.